Sexual abuse claims

Here is something I read on Facebook.

Sexual abuse claims

by Kaeley Triller Harms

I say this now- BEFORE the next election-related sex scandal comes to light. It’s an important conversation.

It’s hard to trust claims of sexual abuse that only seem to come to light when a political seat hangs in the balance. As someone who has spent countless hours working to help women who have been abused, here are some standards I think might be useful in navigating those discussions:

1. Never assume blame OR innocence outright. Investigate thoroughly and without bias. Ask, “What is true?” rather than, “What do I want to be true, and how can I justify it?”

2. Never dismiss allegations simply because the candidate looks squeaky clean and the accuser has a messy personal life. A fractured personal life is often evidence of abuse, not proof of innocence.

3. LISTEN to women you trust who have walked the abuse recovery road and helped others do the same. They can often see patterns others don’t.

4. Don’t assume just because YOU’RE only hearing about the allegations in the context of an election that the people making the allegations are lying or out for financial gain.

For some strange reason, I remain unable to locate the lengthy list of women who have fast tracked their way to fame and fortune by making false allegations to destroy people’s’ careers. ANY time these women speak up (regardless of who they’re accusing or which way they vote), they are subject to a deluge of some of the most depraved and hateful abuse and cyber bullying you can possibly imagine.
They stand to lose so much more than they stand to gain.

Sometimes these women have been speaking up for years, but their cries haven’t mattered enough to anyone for them to do anything about it UNTIL political strings are attached.

Other times, they convinced themselves their stories weren’t worth sharing until they realized their abuser was going to be given a lot of power with which to hurt others.

5. Even if you’re fully convinced a woman is lying, communicate in such a way that you wouldn’t be ashamed to discover you were wrong.

Imagine you had called someone a fat, ugly, lying b*tch only to discover conclusive proof that she had, in fact, been raped by your favorite candidate. How would you feel about that? Now ask yourself why so many women wait so long to speak.

6. Have grace for those who don’t see your perspective. This is the hardest one of all.

7. When power is involved, the standard should be “above reproach.” Try to hold candidates to that standard as best you are able.

Posted on March 5, 2020, in Facebook and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Comments Off on Sexual abuse claims.

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Tulips & Honey

Christian, wife, mom, homeschooler, podcaster

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